What Are The Varmilo EC Switches


For someone who absolutely loves Varmilo, I have to take the time to write about one of their switches. Varmilo has four switches that you can find on their mechanical keyboards. The EC Daisy V2, EC Sakura V2, the EC Rose V2 and the EC Ivy. If you are a fan of the Cherry MX style of switches, then these are a good type to invest in. If you combine these switches and the quality of the Varmilo mechanical keyboard, you are going to have a keyboard that not only is a beautiful keyboard to play and type on, but you're making a well placed investment.

I have the Sea Melody full sized mechanical keyboard from Varmilo. It's so well made. It's heavy, but that means everything is protected. You cannot bend the keyboard, no way, because it is sturdy and that is one of the best signs you can have when it comes to a mechanical keyboard. If you're interested in what else you need to look for in a keyboard, check out my other article: click me!

Varmilo is a Chinese keyboard manufacturer that is know for it's elegant and artisan designs. While some come off as simple, lacking RGB LED lights and no printed designs on the keycaps, keeping it simple and classic with a few colors. Some come with beautiful and unique designs and colors, with white LED lighting to enhance their look. On top of that, they have compatibility of their boards with Cherry MX switches, letting you further customize if you want.

What are the Varmilo EC switches

Varmilo EC Switches

The EC Daisy V2 is the sort of switch a user will want to use if they're trying to avoid finger fatigue. It's a lighter switch, in fact one of the lightest at 35cN, which means long use on this keyboard will not affect the user whether they are gaming, writing, or constantly using their keyboard for long periods of time. This switch should also benefit someone with smaller hand.


EC Daisy V2 Switch Facts

Actuation Force

35cN

Pre Travel

2.0mm

Total Travel

4.0mm

Switch

Linear

Sound

Clicky


The EC Sakura V2 is a switch similar to the red switch – it's a linear switch. So if you like the red switch, you'll identify with this kind. It's a great switch for every day life, for instance, those who game and work on a regular basis. This switch is versatile and can be easily used for both. And like all red switches, they have a great lifespan.


EC Sakura V2 Switch Facts

Actuation Force

45cN

Pre Travel

2.0mm

Total Travel

4.0mm

Switch

Linear

Sound

Quiet


The EC Rose V2 switch is also a linear switch. It's slightly heavier, resembling the same force as the Cherry MX Brown switch. If you like brown switches, but would prefer a smooth linear switch, then the Rose or Rosery is a good choice. Many gamers have reviewed the Rose V2 switch as a perfect middle ground between the red and silver switch.


EC Rosery V2 Switch Facts

Actuation Force

55cN

Pre Travel

2.0mm

Total Travel

4.0mm

Switch

Linear

Sound

Quiet


The Varmilo EC Ivy switch is the tactile sibling to the rest of the Varmilo switches. They are notably louder and have a more pronounced bump than brown switches; though, they are known as feeling quite satisfying upon keypress. The Ivy switches are reviewed as both good for gaming and typing. Typing gradually out rating the gaming aspect for these keys.


EC Ivy Switch Facts

Actuation Force

50cN

Pre Travel

2.4mm

Total Travel

4.0mm

Switch

Tactile

Sound

Clicky



Varmilo EC Switches Continued

EC means electrocapacitve, meaning 'of or pertaining to electrical capacitance'. Electrocapacitive switches are switches considered to be clones or knock offs of the Topre switches. Essentially it's different switch technology in comparison to the Cherry-style. These switches are capable of preventing NKRO, keychatter and has a faster debounce. Debounce means the removal of the small ripple of current that forms when a mechanical switch is pushed down into an electrical circuit; therefore, making a series of short contacts. Debouncing prevents the switch from making a clean contact and instead, as it's name implies, 'bounces'.

The switches' actuation distance also fluctuates. These switches are supposed to have a longer lifespan than the Cherry MX switches, too. I don't know if that's actually true. However, a good benefit to these switches is that they are compatible with MX dimensions, stems, pins, etc. and they are supposed to be some of the smoothest linear switches on the market. They claim that they are the smoothest of all, yet that's debatable for a lot of gamers and typers. Ultimately that's up to you to decide if they are.

But of course, there is a downfall to these boards, as they are not compatible with most PCBs. That may not matter to a lot of users who buy a mechanical keyboard and do not customize it, yet could be a big deal to those who are a creative and prefer to piece their boards together themselves. Which is awesome, so kudos to those brave people. These switches will pretty much only be for board production (unless they make some changes), meaning they'll come pre-attached to boards already.

There is quite the debate on whether or not these are good for gaming also. A lot of gamers convey that these are better as typing switches.While a lot of gamers say that they are both good for typing and gaming. If you do either one of those throughout the day and night

I look forward to see if these do change and if they become more available to mechanical keyboards and enthusiast who enjoy putting these keyboards together by hand. I also look forward to hearing about the continuous opinions of these switches from people.




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